Mastectomy, Spatial Perception and Movement

Mastectomy, Spatial Perception and Movement

After explaining these phenomena to my client, I suggested she notice any sense of diminished movement on the affected side. To become more aware of the space around her body she could imagine a sphere—something like a snow globe—and standing within it, notice differences her sense of the qualities of the space on each side.

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Morning Posture; Morning Attitude

Morning Posture; Morning Attitude

I also know that moving stiffly--ambulating with the bare minimum of joints engaged--becomes a habit that can’t entirely be blamed on my bodily tissues. Habits take place in the brain. The more often I move stiffly, the more familiar and less optional that way of moving becomes. I can choose how I move.

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Fascial Resonance and Breathing

Fascial Resonance and Breathing

Fascial breathing is quite striking the first time you tune into it.  It might even seem unnerving if you‘re not used to being so intimate with your aliveness. Fascial breathing makes it obvious that you’re alive in your body. This may touch your vulnerability, reminding you of your impermanence.

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Spatial Perception in Daily Life

Spatial Perception in Daily Life

When we resist doing a task, part of the body is holding back.  Instead of all your muscle units working together to finish the chore, a high percentage of them rebel and pull the opposite way.  It’s like driving the car with the brakes on. The chore feels heavy, pressured and hurried.

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Re-conceiving Our Bodies

Re-conceiving Our Bodies

Current fascia research suggests that we’ve had it backwards for several millennia. This research indicates that bones, muscles, and organs--indeed, all other tissues in the body—may be, in fact, specializations within the unified medium of fascia. A primary constituent of embryonic development, fascia is the very clay of our creation. In other words, fascia is the stuff we’re made of. 

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Sisters of the pelvis

Sisters of the pelvis

We dipped into pelvic dance, the ancient feminine communion originally meant to prepare women for pregnancy and childbirth. We explored the possibility of dancing from our ovaries, from our cervices. If we could dance that way, could we not also walk that way? But where and when, in current culture, would that feel safe?

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